Instruct and Delight.


How to Read Chinese Poetry Podcast

A Knowledge Transfer Program of

The Advanced Institute for Global Chinese Studies & The Department of Chinese

Lingnan University of Hong Kong

Introduction

This podcast presents the highlights of the acclaimed book How to Read Chinese Poetry: A Guided Anthology by Columbia University Press to a broad general audience. The podcast consists of 52 episodes, covering the major poetic genres developed from antiquity to the modern era. A team of leading experts guides listeners to explore the rich heritage of Chinese poetry, poem by poem, genre by genre, and dynasty by dynasty. Each episode provides a deep but pleasurable discussion of one or more famous poems and their cultural milieu. Special efforts will be made to demonstrate how the poems work in the original language to create a fascinating yet untranslatable kind of poetic beauty. Poems are read aloud in English and Mandarin, and for Tang and Song poetry in Cantonese as well, to the background of classical Chinese qin music.
Zong-qi Cai, Program Host

Podcast Channels:Spotify, Anchor, Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, and Ximalaya.

Textual Sources:
How to Read Chinese Poetry: A Guided Anthology
How to Read Chinese Poetry Workbook
How to Read Chinese Poetry in Context

All published by Columbia University Press

A video introduction to the How to Read Chinese Literature book series can be found HERE.or Listeners’ Oral Reading For each topic, additional poems from How to Read Chinese Poetry: A Guided Anthology will be provided for oral reading to enhance the listeners’ understanding of the chosen texts and their contexts. We encourage listeners to read these poems aloud (in English, Mandarin, and/or Cantonese), have their readings recorded in the audio or video form, and share the recordings in “Chinese Poetry Podcast Group” (https://www.facebook.com/groups/746715270047937 ) . All audio/video recordings are eligible to be considered for public posting on the website chinesepoetrypodcast.com, with due acknowledgement. To encourage language learning and ensure fair competition for awards, we plan to organize recordings under two separate categories: “Read by Native Speakers” and “Read by Non-Native Speakers.” If we have sufficient audio/video submissions, we will consider giving an award to the most active participants. The award may be a combination of 1) a certificate of recognition, 2) posting of audio and/or video productions on the website for public listening/viewing; 3) a copy of How to Read Chinese Poetry: A Guided Anthology or any other book from the How to Read Chinese Literature series. Have fun with your oral reading and audio/video recording! We hope to hear/watch your performance very soon!

Poems for Listeners’ Oral Reading

For each topic, additional poems from How to Read Chinese Poetry: A Guided Anthology will be provided for oral reading to enhance the listeners’ understanding of the chosen texts and their contexts. 

We encourage listeners to read these poems aloud (in English, Mandarin, and/or Cantonese), have their readings recorded in the audio or video form,  and share the recordings in “Chinese Poetry Podcast Group” (https://www.facebook.com/groups/746715270047937

Chinese Poetry Podcast Group This group is established for listeners of “How to Read Chinese Poetry Podcast,” with an aim to facilitate their interaction with episode hosts and fellow listeners. Among other things, interested… www.facebook.com

All audio/video recordings are eligible to be considered for public posting on the website chinesepoetrypodcast.com, with due acknowledgement.  To encourage language learning and ensure fair competition for awards, we plan to organize recordings under two separate categories: “Read by Native Speakers” and “Read by Non-Native Speakers.”

If we have sufficient audio/video submissions, we will consider giving an award to the most active participants.  The award may be a combination of 1) a certificate of recognition, 2) posting of audio and/or video productions on the website for public listening/viewing; 3) a copy of How to Read Chinese Poetry: A Guided Anthology or any other book from the How to Read Chinese Literature series. 

Have fun with your oral reading and audio/video recording! We hope to hear/watch your performance very soon! 

Program Schedule

Part I Pre-Qin Times

Topic 1 The Book of Poetry
Guest host: William H. Nienhauser (University of Wisconsin at Madison)


Episode 1 Marriage Poems (“The Grove at Zhu”, “The Peach Tree Tender”) [PDF] (Feb.1)

Many of the 160 guofeng or airs of the states are poems depicting lovers both true to their partners and false. “On the mountain is the thorn elm” seems to depict a relationship gone bad. It is followed by one of the most famous marriage poems, “The Peach Tree Tender,” in which a village singer outside the family praises the selection of a new bride.

Episode 2 Courtship Poems (“I Beg You, Zhongzi”, “The Banks of Ru”, “The Retiring Girl”) [PDF] (Feb.8)

The three courtship forms, “I Beg of you, Zhong Zi,” “The Banks of the Ru,” and “The Retiring Girl,” present contrasting depictions of the courtship process in early China. In the first, a village encounter between two lovers or potential lovers is depicted. The man and the woman in “The Banks of the Ru” may be married or simply lovers, but the link to the previous poem is the concern about the girl’s parents. This is the most clearly erotic of the poems presented. “The Retiring Girl” depicts a couple in a relationship with the young woman still reticent to have their love made public.

Episode 3 Zhou Dynastic Building (“Woven and Unbrokens”) [PDF] (Feb.15)

“Woven” like many of the Da ya (Greater Odes) sings of two of the heroes who laid the groundwork for their grandson and son to overcome the Shang and establish the Zhou dynasty. The text lends itself to memorization and may have been part of early court ritual as our own Star-Spangled Banner celebrates an event in the early history of our country. 

Topic 2 The Book of Poetry and Diplomacy
Guest host: Wai-yee Li (Harvard University)


Episode 4 Who is the Barbarian? (“Blue Flies”) [PDF] (Feb.22)

This episode discusses how a “barbarian” chief gains diplomatic advantages by reciting an ode now included in Shijing. The recitation both asserts and effaces differences between “Chinese” and “barbarian” states. It seeks to redefine the past and argues for equality and amity between Jin and the Rong.


Episode 5 Who is the Boss? (“Sixth Month”, “Great Brightness”, “Lesser”) [PDF] (Mar.1)

This episode uses two scenes of reciting odes to explore the struggle for hegemony. The first shows how a fugitive Jin Prince declare his ambition despite his precarious and dependent position. The second features a Jin leader pushing back against the hubristic self-aggrandizement of a Chu prince.


Episode 6 What Does it Mean to Say, “I love you”? (“Magpie’s Nest”, “Picking Artemesia.” “There is a Dead Doe in the Wilds”, “Plumtree”) [PDF] (Mar.8)

This episode discusses how the language of love and kinship is used in diplomatic negotiations through the recitation of odes. For example, aLu minister uses a wedding song to compare smaller states to a bride welcomed by her groom (the powerful Jin). A woman picking artemisia with care becomes the analogue for a powerful state cherishing a weak one. A Zheng minister uses an ode about seduction to forestall or resist aggression. A Jin leader affirms an alliance through an ode celebrating brotherhood.

Topic 3 The Book of Poetry: The Han Canonization
Host: Zong-qi Cai (Lingnan University of Hong Kong; University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign)


Episode 7 A Love Song and A Moral Exemplum (“Osprey”) [PDF] (Mar.15)

This episode discusses how the anonymous author of “Prefaces to the Book of Poetry” turned “Osprey,” the first of the 305 Shijing poems, from a lively love song into a moral exempla by means of gender switching. It also explains that such imaginative gender switching was made possible by classical Chinese grammar, especially its ungendered use of pronouns and its frequent omission of sentence subjects.


Episode 8 Romeo and Juliet-like Rendezvous (“I Beg of You, Zhong Zi”) [PDF] (Mar.22)

This episode features a poem that enacts, through incremental repetition, the unfolding drama of a young woman being torn by longing, hesitancy, love, and fear while a suitor is crushing all physical barriers to have a tryst with her. To sanitize this poem, Han commentators resorted to an allegorizing strategy called “cutting off a section to create a new meaning,” constructing a political allegory on the thinnest of evidence.


Episode 9 Dead Deer Meat as a Gift (“There is a Dead Doe in the Wilds”) [PDF] (Mar.29)

This episode looks at the concerted effort by three prominent Han commentators to allegorize a poem made up of disjointed or rather conflicting parts. It also reflects on the ironic fact that Han commentators’ allegorizing process itself constitutes a beautiful exercise of literary imagination, foreshadowing the fruitful exploitation of semantic, syntactic, and structural ambiguities by Du Fu, Li Shangyin, and other Tang poets.

Topic 4 The Lyrics of Chu: Qu Yuan and His Poetic Allegories
Guest Host: Fusheng Wu (The University of Utah)

Episode 10 A General Introduction to Chuci (“The Lord of the Xiang River”)[PDF]

This episode provides a brief general introduction to Chuci; it also discusses a poem in this repertoire, Xian jun(“The Lord of the Xiang River), and its influence on Li sao (“On Encountering Trouble”) that will be discussed in the next two episodes.


Episode 11 The Poetic Persona in Lisao or “On Encountering Trouble” [PDF]

This episode discusses Li sao or On Encountring Trouble,” the crowning achievement in the Chu ci repertoire. This poem evolves around the life of Qu Yuan, a poetic persona who is the alleged author of the poem. In the first part of the poem, Qu Yuan talks at length about his glorious family history and his own self-cultivation.


Episode 12 Spiritual and Imaginary Journeys in Lisao or “On Encountering Trouble” [PDF]

This episode continues our previous discussion of the Li sao or On Encountering Trouble. It focuses on two failed spiritual/supernatural trips or flights in search of Qu Yuan’s ideal and his final decision to commit suicide as the result of his disillusionment with his ruler and society.

Topic 5 Lisao: The Poem and Its Author As a Composite Text
Guest Host: Martin Kern (Princeton University)


Episode 13 The Meaning of Qu Yuan in the Western Han [PDF]

This episode discusses what the Qu Yuan persona meant to Han dynasty intellectuals. Why was Qu Yuan important to Han thinkers in literary, political, and historical, terms? What did they find in the Qu Yuan persona? How did they identify with that persona of their imagination?

Episode 14 The Fusion of Poetry and Biography [PDF]

This episode discusses how Qu Yuan’s poetry and biography flow seamlessly into each other, and how the figures of poetic hero and heroic poet repeatedly switched places. Likewise, later transmitters, commentators, and poets could appropriate Qu Yuan’s voice with ease.

Episode 15 The Lisao as a Composite Intertext [PDF]

This episode offers a detailed discussion of the structure and diction of the Lisao and describes the text not as a single poem but as a composite text created from different poetic registers, and different voices, that are otherwise known from the poems of Jiu ge, Jiu zhang, and Tian wen.

Topic 6 Yuefu Poetry
Guest Host: Jui-lung Su (National University of Singapore)


Episode 16 War as a Theme in Early Popular Chinese Poetry [PDF]

This episode first discusses the functions of the Han Music Bureau and the yuefu poetry as a poetic genre. It points out the fact that we still don’t know if the Bureau really collected these songs from various regions and matched them with music. Many of the popular poems we now call “Han yuefu” are actually preserved in the History of the Liu Song Dynasty written in the sixth century. The second part focuses on analyzing the yuefu poem entitled, “We Fought South of the Walls” from different angles.

Episode 17 A Bad Breakup in the Han Yuefu [PDF]

This episode discusses how Qu Yuan’s poetry and biography flow seamlessly into each other, and how the figurThis episode analyzes this yuefu piece from different perspectives. As many of the popular songs of the Han, this poem contains dialogue and monologue at the same time. The poem follows a daring woman’s emotional changes from her initial rage against her lover from the south who jilted her to an unsettling feeling of anxiety.es of poetic hero and heroic poet repeatedly switched places. Likewise, later transmitters, commentators, and poets could appropriate Qu Yuan’s voice with ease.

Episode 18 Political Satire or Coquetry? An Ambiguous Song [PDF]

This episode discusses the two opposing interpretations of the poem entitled, “Mulberry Along the Lane,” one of the best-known yuefu songs in classical Chinese literature. Traditionally this poem has been interpreted as a representation of social injustice, depicting the situation of an official harassing a peasant girl. The other perspective is the poem is simply a verbal flirtation between a man and a woman and a popular song about a clever lady who employs an engaging and inoffensive way to turn down her suitor.

(to be continued)

Media Coverage

We are delighted to share with you the Hong Kong local news reports about our How to Read Chinese Poetry Podcast program. This podcast series is based on this guided anthology of 143 famous poems, which was designed to help students overcome language barriers and engage with Chinese poetical texts in ways that yield as much aesthetic pleasure and intellectual insight as one could glean from the originals.
Hong Kong press interviews of Prof. Zong-qi Cai about How To Read Chinese Poetry Podcast Series

Ming Pao, Sing Tao Daily, Bastille Post,
Wen Wei Po, Lion Rock Dail

Please stay tuned and leave your feedback HERE!
You are also welcome to join Forum on Chinese Poetic Culture

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

Program Manager: HUANG Yu, Heidi

Audio Producer: LIU Kin-chung, Keith

Production Assistants: CHENG Ching-hang, Matthew; YANG Hudi

Chinese Poems Recital Performers: ZHAO Wenxuan; ZHAO Sikun

Graphics Designers: WANG Ziwei; ZHAO Sikun

Photo Credits: LUO Zhenyu